Mark Rudio

3 for March

Mark Rudio
3 for March

1. 2 Scheherazades

Leila Josefowicz

Leila Josefowicz

Rimsky-Korsakov composed Scheherazade in 1888, and more than a century later, few works have matched the sensuality imbued throughout that suite for orchestra and solo violin. It’s a warhorse, but in the right hands it remains very effective. It’s also been the recent inspiration for composer John Adams, who created Scheherazade 2.0 as a concerto for violinist Leila Josefowicz, who premiered the work in 2015 with the New York Phil. Since its debut, Scheherazade 2.0 has been hailed as one of Adams’ most effective recent compositions.

Josefowicz and the two Scheherazades appear on this promising double bill, although it’s unclear if Josefowicz will be performing as the soloist in Rimsky’s version. Either way, it’s one of the most appealing programs of the entire season, not least because there’s a reason Josefowicz is one of today’s go-to soloists for contemporary composers — she’s an absolutely thrilling musician.

Saturday, March 9, 8:00 pm at Strathmore.
Friday and Sunday performances at Meyerhoff Hall.
Click here for tickets and info.

2. 6 extraordinary talents

L to R: Yasushi Nakamura, Melissa Aldana, Cécile McLorin Salvant, Christian Sands, Bria Skonberg, Jamison Ross

L to R: Yasushi Nakamura, Melissa Aldana, Cécile McLorin Salvant, Christian Sands, Bria Skonberg, Jamison Ross

Monterey Jazz Festival on Tour, featuring Cécile McLorin Salvant
Under the banner of Monterey Jazz Festival on Tour, Washington Performing Arts presents one of the most interesting singers alive fronting a band of extremely talented young jazz musicians, included the brilliant sax player Melissa Aldana.
At Strathmore on Thursday, March 21 at 8:00 pm.
The band:
Cécile McLorin Salvant, vocals
Bria Skonberg, trumpet
Melissa Aldana, tenor saxophone
Christian Sands, piano, music director
Yasushi Nakamura, bass
Jamison Ross, drums
Tickets: $38-$68
Click here for tickets and info.

3. 1 complete masterpiece by Tchaikovsky

The Robert Carsen production of Eugene Onegin at the Lyric Opera of Chicago.  Photo: © Todd Rosenberg

The Robert Carsen production of Eugene Onegin at the Lyric Opera of Chicago. Photo: © Todd Rosenberg

Washington National Opera presents Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin for the first time in over thirty years at the Kennedy Center Opera House. According to Operabase, Onegin is one of the most widely performed operas in the world (it ranks 16th in total number of performances worldwide between 2004-16) , but it’s not quite a regular at American opera houses. That’s a shame, because this opera really has it all - a compelling story based on Pushkin, mesmerizing but flawed characters, unrequited love, a tragic death, marvelous music from start to finish, and two of the best arias heard in the opera house. It’s a must-see for anyone who loves the art form and perfect for first-timers, newbies, and dilettantes.
Peter McClintock directs the Robert Carsen production, which hails from the Canadian Opera Company and has been staged at the Met and Chicago’s Lyric Opera. The young American conductor Robert Trevino makes his WNO debut with a cast led by a trio of Russian singers - Anna Nechaeva (Tatiana), Igor Golovatenko (Onegin), and Alexey Dolgov (Lensky), all making local debuts. In Russian with English surtitles.
March 9e, 17m, 20e, 23e, 25e & 29e at the Kennedy Center.
Click here for tickets and info.